PLAIN VIEW HERITAGE FARM,

RURAL BRYANT, SD, PRESENTS:

THE STADEM FAMILIES SAGA CONTINUES'

VETERANS TRIBUTE PAGE


"Farm Boy Going Off to War"

TRIBUTE TO STADEM VETERANS

WE OF THE STADEM FAMILY RELATIONSHIP SALUTE YOU, BOTH THE LIVING,

AND THOSE WHO HAVE FINISHED LIFE'S LAST BATTLE AND GONE HOME TO THE LORD...AND THE LATTER IN UPPER CASE WITH GOLD STARS...

American Revolutionary War

Stadems in the First Wave of Stadem immigration from Norway arrived in 1790, so they must not have fought in the Revolutionary War. Information on this is requested from our First Wave relatives who may know things we of the Second Wave wouldn't know without a lot of genealogical digging.

War of 1812, Tripoli, Mexican War, Spanish American War, Civil War

Information is requested on these wars and possible Stadem involvement. Stadems from the "First Wave" of family immigration may well have fought in the Union Army, and possibly even the Confederate Army. Grandma, or Mama Bergit, prized a very heavy, little. white stoneware-type dish for holding a couple fried eggs that was used to feed Union soldiers. It was in the keeping of her eldest child, Pearl Ginther (age aged 101 when she passed to Glory), and is destined for the P.V.F. Heritage Center Archives.

World War I

(From the Brothers' Shared Grave Marker)

MALVIN STADEM--GOLD STAR

ADOLPH STADEM--GOLD STAR

World War II

HANS SPILDE--GOLD STAR (shaking hands with brother-in-law Bob Ginther)


ARTHUR DONALD STADEM--GOLD STAR


LEROY STADEM

Korean War & Era

BRUCE LIVINGSTONE BROWN--GOLD STAR

"Honorary Stadem Veteran, Uncle to JERRY L. GINTHER, Stadem Veteran)

GEORGE LEE BALDWIN--GOLD STAR

BRUCE LIVINGSTONE BROWN--GOLD STAR

Vietnam War & Era

LUTHER SVANOE-GOLD STAR

Russell Del Von Schaefer--served in Viet Nam

Victor Svanoe--served in Viet Nam

JERRY LEE GINTHER--GOLD STAR, served for a time in area of Viet Nam, on board ship

Gulf War, & Bosnia Peacekeeping Conflict

No data for these conflicts. Information requested.

_____________________________________________________

Note on the Korean War: This very bloody and hard-fought conflict is called the "Forgotten War," though President Truman described it as the most dangerous war ever fought by the U.S. The war ceased with no treaty but an armistice signed on July 27, 1953, so it has never officially ended, with North Korea still a hostile antagonist and now a nuclear-missile-armed, diehard communist power. Lt. Colonel Bruce Brown, the father to John Livingstone Brown in the Stadem relationship by marriage, is standing on the far right in the picture. The late Bruce Brown served in the Korean War and also served in Korea during peacetime.--Editors




ANNOUNCEMENT: A special tribute was veterans at the coming Fourth of July Weekend Reunion, 2000, at Plain View Farm, Bryant, South Dakota. Stadem Descendents were honored for peacetime service in the Coast Guard between the Korean War and the Viet Nam War. This will be the second such commemoration at Plain View Farm of our veterans. At last year's Reunion the names of veterans were written on signs and placed like banners on poles and carried by family participants. All present found it a very moving ceremony. At a previous Reunion, Viet Nam Veteran Russell Del Von Schaefer shared experiences he had in the View Nam War, which was much appreciated by those present and a videotape was made which will be greatly valued.

SPECIAL MENTION: Special mention is here given to Russell Del Von Schaefer, Viet Nam combat veteran. He shared his helicopter service and flying mission experience with those at a recent Reunion. He could have told even more, which was stunning to hear, for we have since heard that a commander volunteered himself to fly back into enemy territory to retrieve Schaefer, who had been shot down--that is how much this brave man was appreciated by the commander and the men of Russell Del Von Schaefer's unit who had first volunteered when hearing of Schaefer's predicament and need for rescue. Special mention is also given to Victor Svanoe, who not only served in the war in Viet Nam, but went back after his term of service to help the Vietnamese farmers to dig wells. He got very sick, nearly died, and had to come home. He learned Vietnamese and after the war continued to help this people over in the U.S. deal with Vietnamese immigration problems and adjustment here. His actions demonstrate a love for the Vietnamese that went far beyond the call of duty.--Editors

ANNOUNCEMENT: A World War II Memorial for Veterans was authorized by the President, May 25, 1999. This Registry wil be kept on permanent display in Washington, D.C., to ensure that the names of these Patriotic Americans are recorded in history for all time. Arthur Donald Stadem has been submitted by brother and fellow WWII Veteran Leroy Stadem and family to the Registry of Remembrances, along with a money gift for the Memorial.--Editors

2000 MEMORIAL DAY MESSAGE FROM ESTELLE STADEM-RANGEN AND JOSEPH RANGEN: "Marcelle Fischeeler from San Fernando, Ca. shares a true experience, 'My daughter and I were waiting to cross a busy street when a tapping sound made me turn. Approaching briskly and confidently was a handsome young man carrying a white cane and wearing a service discharge button. Knowing how sensitive some people are about their afflictions, I said timidly, 'Traffic's pretty heavy today, son. Do you mind if we cross with you?' 'Not at all,' he replied cheerfully. 'I've lived in this neighborhood all my life, except when I was in the service. That's when I lost my sight.' Traffic slackened, and we crossed and walked on down the street together. 'Next week I'm going to another state to a prison where a friend of mine is going to be electrocuted,' the young man told us. Trying not to sound shocked, I repeated, 'A friend of yours?' 'Yes,' he said quietly, 'you see, although we've never met, he's giving me his eyes.'' We thought this was an appropriate incident to share on this 2000 Memorial Day. Our country, and our God...With all that is within us, we love you each one! Let Freedom ring...Estelle and Joe Rangen"

Trinity Broadcasting Network has just aired, June 30,2006, the wonderful and inspiring film, "The Conscientious Objector," which relates the unbelievable but true heroism and faith of a Medal of Honor winner, Desmond Doss, who served as a medic in the Okinawa war zone, one of the most savage scenes of warfare in history, near the close of World War II. Acclaimed by all for the many lives he saved with his heroic self-sacrifices, there may have been no braver man than Desmond Doss, as he repeatedly, again and again, put himself in harm's way to save a life, even to getting off a litter, himself badly wounded by a grenade explosion, to go to the aid of a wounded man on the way to the hospital. He was then hit by a bullet shattering his arm, and he crawled three hundred yards with the remaining arm to the medic station. Returned home, at the Medal of Honor ceremony, President Truman told him it was a greater honor to award him that medal than it was to be President of the United States. That was the highest compliment Truman, or any president for that matter, could possibly give any man--and he gave it to Desmond Doss. If you want to see this most amazing man's story, go to TBN for the viewing of this film, or go to the website that can tell you how to access the video. You will not be disappointed if you do.

Desmond Doss, Godly Hero Extraordinaire


Links to other sites on the Web

New Pages and Links for Return Visitors


CENTRAL FOR ROAD MAPS


A Tribute to WWII Veteran, Arthur Stadem


Information Site for the World War II Memorial


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